Cessna Citation II Approaching Storms and Landing Nashville


A Cessna Citation II (CE-550) departing just before a thunder storm moves over the airport. As we taxi the aircraft to the runway you can see the shelf cloud of the approaching storm. This was an empty flight where we were doing some flight training so you can hear discussion of speeds to use and technique. The Citation is a probably on of the easiest jets to learn to fly. During the visual approach we pick up some light rain and the landing is on runway 2C at the Nashville International Airport (KBNA).

Citation Mustang Landing Rogers Arkansas


A beautiful day for a Cessna Mustang single pilot flight to Rogers Municipal Airport-Carter Field Arkansas. This was the day after northwest Arkansas was hit by a winter storm. I approach the airport from the east and fly a right base for a landing on runway 2. You can see lots of snow on the ground and the snow plow has cleared a narrow strip down the center of the runway. ATC and tower radio communications can be heard in the audio.

A Cessna Citation 560 Landing Nashville and ATC traffic


A Cessna Citation Encore (CE560) makes a visual approach and landing to runway 2R at the Nashville International Airport (BNA). This early morning arrival into Nashville starts with a left downwind to runway 2R that takes us over the downtown area of the city. This can be a surprisingly busy airport. At times there are so many Southwest flights arriving and departing that you would think they owned this place. For student pilots this video has lots of ATC radio communications traffic as well as a good cockpit view of the landing.

Cessna Citation Encore Landing Behind Snow Showers


A Cessna Citation Encore CE560 landing in snow showers at the St. Louis Cahokia Downtown airport KCPS. We’re landing after the heavier snow showers have moved off. The white flashes you can see on the windshield are individual snow flakes hitting the windshield at 135 mph. Flying in snow can create a couple of problems. If the runway is snow covered it increases our stopping distance and with a strong cross wind can create control problems on the runway. The other problem is an inflight issue of precipitation static. When flying through snow the aircraft can accumulate a static charge on the airframe faster than the static wicks can dissipate it. When this happens the radios pick up a loud static which can make them unusable till the static discharges.

Cessna Citation Mustang ILS approach, Landing and ATC Radio


A Short single pilot IFR flight in the Cessna Citation Mustang (CE-510). I takeoff in light rain from the St. Louis Downtown Cahokia airport (KCPS) and fly an ILS approach and landing into the Spirit of St. Louis Airport (KSUS). It’s a very short eight minute flight between the two airports. When flying Single pilot in instrument conditions, especially on short IFR flights in congested air space, the pilot work load can be extremely high. A thorough familiarity with the autopilot and avionics is a must. In situations like this the autopilot acts as your dumb copilot, faithfully flying altitude and heading while you work the radios and set up the approach. It’s important to have as much of the cockpit and avionics set up before takeoff as possible. This morning I was being vectored for the ILS 26L approach two minutes after takeoff. With two to three minutes to localizer intercept there is very little time to get set up and familiarize yourself with the approach. If you don’t have time to get setup ask for a delaying vector before accepting the approach clearance. Passing to the south of Lambert (KSTL), the approach controller gives us a vector to the right to intercept the localizer. After being handed off to spirit tower I’m cleared to land. Closer to the airport my landing clearance is revoked and the controller directs us to continue. She does this so she can launch another aircraft before we land. After the departing aircraft is rolling down the runway we are again cleared to land. This video includes Air traffic control radio communications and more of the Garmin G1000 instrument panel.

Cessna Citation Night Landing at Nashville International Airport (BNA) Runway 31


Flying at night has its own rewards and challenges. On a clear winter night the view can be spectacular. At other times darkness and restricted visibility can increase pilot workload or cause disorientation. On this night we were treated to a spectacular view of Nashville Tennessee. Unfortunately video doesn’t capture the beauty that many pilots are treated to in the thin cold air at flight levels or flying over city lights on a clear winter night. This night we approached Nashville from the west just as the first bands of pink broke on the horizon. While on a wide downwind on the north side of the field Nashville approach cleared for the visual approach to runway 31. This route takes you over a large unlighted area to the east of the field which in the dark appears as a large void. The void is actually the J Percy Priest Reservoir. During night flights especially in poor visibility it’s easy to get disoriented or lose track of how high you are above the ground. In order to ensure adequate ground clearance the aircraft is flown at a minimum safe altitude(MSA) till its flight path intersects with a Visual approach slope indicator (VASI) or electronic glide path. This ensures that the airplane maintains a safe obstacle free flight all the way to the surface of the runway. On this flight there wasn’t a VASI so the ILS was used to back up the visual approach for terrain clearance. An ILS provides an electronic vertical path to the runway which displays on the pilots attitude indicator. Unfortunately, Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT) accidents while avoidable have been happening since the dawn of powered flight. The FAA places great importance in CFIT training for pilots which is reflected in the training at pilot training centers Like FlightSafety. The best way to avoid CFIT is training, standard procedures, and good situational awareness.

Cessna Citation II landing Naples Florida


A Cessna Citation 550 charter jet crosses the beach at Naples Florida for a landing on runway 23 at APF. Landing view from the cockpit. The Naples Florida airport is just off the beach and landing on a clear day offers a great view of the beach area. Naples is not served by scheduled airline service, so the only flights in and out are general aviation flights or corporate jets.

Cessna Citation Encore Night Cockpit Primus 1000

A Cessna Citation Encore, CE-560 private jet instrument panel during a recent night flight. The Encore has a 3 tube Honeywell Primus 1000  integrated avionics system, RDU’s for radio frequency tuning and a Megitt standby attitude indicator for emergency use. The EFIS and MFD indications show this aircraft is flying north at an altitude of 34,000 ft at a true airspeed of 433 knots and is on a direct course to Rochester Minnesota.

Cessna Citation II Landing Chicago Midway 4R

landing in a Citation 550 on runway 4R at Chicago Midway airport. Midway is basically a one mile by one mile square set in a heavily populated area south of Chicago. All of the runways have displaced thresholds due to the close proximity of buildings. KMDW is one of the world’s busiest general aviation airports. It’s a hub for Southwest airlines and the FBO’s serve hundreds of corporate jets and private air planes on a daily basis. This Cessna Citation II is landing on runway four right. Of interest is how close houses are to the ends of the runway.